Bawku conflict: We feel unsafe going home after vacation – UDS students

Students from the University for Development Studies (UDS) have issued a plea to warring groups in the region, urging them to put an end to their conflict and find a peaceful resolution to their disagreements through conversation.

 

They claim that the regular confrontations that occur in communities such as Bawku are cultivating a sense of divisiveness among them, as seen by the fact that some students have already left common platforms that they used to use together.

 

This, among other things, is having an effect on their studies and their ability to coexist, which is why they are pleading for amicable relations among the parties that feel wronged.

 

The students, all of whom are enrolled at the University for Development Studies and are members of the Upper East Students’ Union, expressed their inability to study together in a group setting owing to the ongoing conflicts in an interview with JoyNews.

 

According to Zoogah Yingura Dorcas, President of the Union from the Nyankpala campus, people who used to be friends now avoid one another on school out of fear of bringing the issue to campus.

Even after returning from vacation, we are afraid to go home since we do not know when the next incident of violence would take place. She begged with those in authority over them, saying, “We call on our leaders and elders at home to light the peace pipe.”

 

Another student, Akugri Pius Awimbe, stated that the majority of them are unable to take on other responsibilities that would earn them money because they are primarily responsible for financing their own education.

 

According to him, as a result of this, some of them have been forced to switch their classes since they do not have enough money to pay their tuition.

Concern was voiced by the Akugri people regarding the impending closure of schools in Bawku due to the fact that a number of Bawku’s teachers and medical professionals have already fled to neighboring towns perceived to be safer.

 

They label us as violent when we compete for leadership positions, and then they use that against us. “When we compete, they use it against us.”

 

In the meantime, Father Thaddeus Kuusah, the Northern Regional Secretary of the National Peace Council (NPC), has stated that they have undertaken a series of interactions with stakeholders at Bawku in order to find a permanent solution to the issue.

 

He stated that an interethnic committee has been established to deal with concerns that arise on a regular basis from the area, particularly at Bawku.

Students from the University for Development Studies (UDS) have issued a plea to warring groups in the region, urging them to put an end to their conflict and find a peaceful resolution to their disagreements through conversation.

 

They claim that the regular confrontations that occur in communities such as Bawku are cultivating a sense of divisiveness among them, as seen by the fact that some students have already left common platforms that they used to use together.

 

This, among other things, is having an effect on their studies and their ability to coexist, which is why they are pleading for amicable relations among the parties that feel wronged.

 

The students, all of whom are enrolled at the University for Development Studies and are members of the Upper East Students’ Union, expressed their inability to study together in a group setting owing to the ongoing conflicts in an interview with JoyNews.

 

According to Zoogah Yingura Dorcas, President of the Union from the Nyankpala campus, people who used to be friends now avoid one another on school out of fear of bringing the issue to campus.

 

Even after returning from vacation, we are afraid to go home since we do not know when the next incident of violence would take place. She begged with those in authority over them, saying, “We call on our leaders and elders at home to light the peace pipe.”

 

Another student, Akugri Pius Awimbe, stated that the majority of them are unable to take on other responsibilities that would earn them money because they are primarily responsible for financing their own education.

According to him, as a result of this, some of them have been forced to switch their classes since they do not have enough money to pay their tuition.

 

Concern was voiced by the Akugri people regarding the impending closure of schools in Bawku due to the fact that a number of Bawku’s teachers and medical professionals have already fled to neighboring towns perceived to be safer.

 

They label us as violent when we compete for leadership positions, and then they use that against us. “When we compete, they use it against us.”

 

In the meantime, Father Thaddeus Kuusah, the Northern Regional Secretary of the National Peace Council (NPC), has stated that they have undertaken a series of interactions with stakeholders at Bawku in order to find a permanent solution to the issue.

 

He stated that an interethnic committee has been established to deal with concerns that arise on a regular basis from the area, particularly at Bawku.

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *