There was no quorum; e-levy passage is unlawful -Minority

The Minority in Parliament claims that staging a walkout during the debate on the Electronic Transfer Levy (E-Levy) was done to prevent the House from forming a quorum.

 

The caucus leader stated that his side obviously strategized to thwart the Majority’s efforts to bring the bill into law.

 

Haruna Iddrisu, speaking to the press shortly after the House passed the E-levy Bill, claimed the passage was illegitimate and unconstitutional since the members present did not meet the needed 138 quorum under Article 104 (1) of the 1992 constitution, as the Supreme Court recently affirmed.

 

He further claimed that Sarah Adwoa Safo, the Majority MP for Dome-Kwabenya, was not in the House.

 

We just left to prevent the majority from forming a voting quorum. Simply put, they were less than 137. Because everyone in the world knows that Hon. Adwoa Safo was not present, I’m using 137. Furthermore, we know that an ambulance was present within the parliament’s boundaries, and that the person said to be in the ambulance was not there in the chamber for the purpose of voting, so every choice they made with 136 flies was a sin against the Supreme Court’s ruling.”

 

The Electronic Transfer Levy was passed in Parliament without the participation of the Minority MPs, who had walked out before the Bill was debated at the second reading stage.

 

The Minority had protested that the sudden consideration of the levy had caught them off guard.

 

The E-levy was not mentioned in this week’s business statement from Parliament. After debating the Bill, the Minority MPs walked out of Parliament before the second reading.

 

Amendments

Because none of the Minority MPs were present to move the amendments in their names, all of the planned amendments were withdrawn.

 

The Speaker of Parliament, Alban Bagbin, expressed astonishment at the walkout by the Minority, but stated that it would not disrupt the proceedings.

 

The fee, which has been reduced from 1.75 percent to 1.5 percent as of today, Tuesday, March 29, 2022, will be a tax on electronic transactions, including mobile money payments.

 

The fee will be applied to electronic transactions totaling more than GH100 each day.

 

Critics of the proposal have warned that the new tax will harm the Fintech industry, as well as low-income persons and others who are not part of the official banking system.

 

The fee, which has been reduced from 1.75 percent to 1.5 percent as of today, Tuesday, March 29, 2022, will be a tax on electronic transactions, including mobile money payments.

 

What exactly is E-levy?

The fee will be applied to electronic transactions totaling more than GH100 each day.

 

Critics of the proposal have warned that the new tax will harm the Fintech industry, as well as low-income persons and others who are not part of the official banking system.

 

Since its introduction in the 2022 budget, the fee has been a cause of contention in Parliament. Tensions to a head in December 2021, when MPs clashed in Parliament.

 

The government, on the other hand, claims that the charge will broaden the tax base, resulting in an additional GH6.9 billion in revenue in 2022. There are also fears that the government would securitize e-levy profits to generate additional money.

 

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